Things tagged 'tfl_consultation'

limited to the area of Hackney Cycling Campaign:

12 issues found for 'tfl_consultation':

  • Lea Bridge - Dalston cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    This 3km route would fill the gap between Lea Bridge and the existing cycle route between the City and Tottenham at Dalston. From Lea Bridge the proposed route heads towards Lea Bridge Road to Lea Bridge roundabout, after which it joins quieter back streets including Downs Park Road and Sandringham Road to connect through to Dalston.

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  • Safer Junctions - Kingsland Road and Balls Pond Road

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    TfL says:

    Overview

    We are proposing to make some changes to the junction between A10 Kingsland Road and Balls Pond Road, also known as Dalston Junction in Hackney.  

    Background

    Our Safer Junctions programme is reducing road danger at some of the most hazardous junctions in London. These junctions have high collision rates for vulnerable road users, including people walking and cycling. This programme directly contributes to our Vision Zero target to stop people from dying and being seriously injured on London’s road network by 2041.

    The objectives of the programme are to:

    • Reduce road danger and help eliminate Killed and Seriously Injured (KSI) collisions
    • Help create streets where people feel safe to walk, cycle and use public transport
    • Make hostile junctions more welcoming and less dominated by motor vehicles, demonstrating the Healthy Streets Approach

    Why we are proposing to change the junction?

    In the three years up to 31 October 2016, 16 collisions occurred which resulted in people being injured. Five of these collisions involved pedestrians (three on the southern arm, one on the western arm and one on the northern arm). Historic trends also highlight a significant risk for cyclists, although this was not captured as a trend within the 2016/17 study period.

    Changing the layout of this junction would:

    • Reduce road danger by providing more space and priority to people walking or cycling
    • Restrict some vehicle movements to reduce conflict with other road users
    • Make journeys by foot to and from Dalston Junction easier with wider and more direct pedestrian crossings, encouraging more journeys by walking, cycling or public transport
    • Create a more welcoming retail and leisure environment, encouraging people to spend more time in the area

    What are we proposing?

    The proposals are to upgrade the existing junction in a number of ways:

    • Widening the footway to the north, east and western arms to improve the space for people walking
    • Installing coloured surfacing on all pedestrian crossing points to make it easier and safer to cross
    • A new cycle feeder lane into the Advanced Stop Line southbound on A10 Kingsland High Street
    • Banning the left turn eastbound from A10 Kingsland High Street into Dalston Lane for all vehicles except cycles
    • Raising the pedestrian crossing on Dalston Lane at the top of Dalston Square to slow speeds making it easier and safer for people to cross
    • Closing Kingsland Passage to motor vehicles and installing of new seating for places to stop and rest

    A plan showing all the proposed changes is below. These changes are intended to make the junction safer for all users, while significantly improving the environment for people walking and cycling, improving access to Dalston Junction Overground station.

    Kingsland Road/Balls Pond Road proposals (PDF 704KB)

    Healthy Streets  

    The changes proposed in this scheme are part of our commitment to deliver the Healthy Streets Approach. We are taking this approach to create a vibrant, successful city where the streets are welcoming to all and everyone can live active, healthy lives. The streets within this scheme and the proposed changes have been assessed by our designers against ten Healthy Streets Indicatorsusing our Healthy Streets Check for Designers tool. This tool assesses the layout of streets against thirty one measures which produce an overall Healthy Streets Check score out of 100. We use infographics to show the current score for the streets within this scheme and potential scores based on our proposed changes. The Healthy Streets results can be seen in the diagram below.

    Kingsland Road/Balls Pond Road Healthy Streets results (PDF 132KB)

    Equality Impact Assessment

    We are subject to the general public sector equality duty set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010, which requires us to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics. The protected characteristics are: age, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.

    In considering changes to the design of our streets, we closely consider the needs of all users throughout the design process and complete a draft Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA). The draft EqIA can be found below.

    Kingsland Road/Balls Pond Road Equality Impact Assessment (PDF 162KB)

    Traffic impacts

    We have carried out analysis to understand the impact of the above proposals.  We predict no significant impacts to general traffic or bus journey times on the A10, Dalston Lane or Balls Pond Road. No significant impact on journey times for general traffic or buses travelling along the A10. 

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  • Camden - Tottenham Hale cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 4 threads

    At approximately 12km, this route would connect the town centres of Tottenham Hale, Seven Sisters and the Nag's Head, making it easier for people to make local journeys and use local services. The route would use both main roads and quieter back streets.

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  • Hackney - Isle of Dogs cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    This 7.5km route would stretch from Hackney to the Isle of Dogs via Westferry, Mile End and Victoria Park. It would connect with the cycle routes between Stratford and Aldgate and Barking to Tower Hill, as well as the proposed Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf crossing. There are currently two options in Hackney we want your views on.

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  • Balls Pond Road Cycle Superhighway 1

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Hackney council says:

    Hackney Council is working with Islington
    Council and Transport for London (TfL) to make
    improvements to the Cycle Superhighway Route
    1 (CS1) on Balls Pond Road.

    In February 2015 TfL in partnership with
    Hackney Council consulted on the CS1 route
    which included two options for Balls Pond Road:
    an option for advisory cycle lanes on each
    side of the road and an option for a two-way
    segregated cycle track. A positive response to
    the consultation was received showing overall
    support for the segregated two-way cycle track
    along Balls Pond Road.

    In autumn 2015 a second consultation was
    held by TfL in partnership with Hackney Council
    on a motor traffic reduction scheme in the De
    Beauvoir area to assist users of the CS1 route.
    We are now seeking your views on measures
    required to implement the segregated two-way
    cycle track along Balls Pond Road between the
    junctions of Culford Road and Kingsbury Road.
    These measures would complete the route, safely
    connecting the two halves of the CS1.

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  • Stoke Newington Gyratory

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    We have worked with Hackney Council on proposals for how Stoke Newington would look and operate after the gyratory is removed. Our plans would provide a new northbound cycle track on the A10 and a new bus and cycle lane enabling people to cycle southbound on Stoke Newington High Street.

    This would remove a significant barrier to cycling in the area and provide new traffic-free public spaces to meet, shop, play and relax and a host of other improvements aimed at creating a more attractive and less traffic-dominated environment for people.

    Our plans will accommodate the area’s future growth and encourage active travel, with more people choosing to walk, cycle and use public transport and less people travelling by car.

    These proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:

    Transforming the town centre by creating a single unified retail location with an enhanced environment for pedestrians and cyclists
    Improving the public transport interchange, achieved through two-way bus operation, reducing congestion, and simplifying bus stops
    Improving cycling facilities and access through the A10
    Encouraging more journeys by walking, cycling or public transport to/from the High Street
    Reducing rat-running in residential streets

    Our proposals would:

    Introduce a new northbound cycle track with bus stop bypasses on Stoke Newington High Street providing a dedicated space for people to cycle
    Introduce a new southbound bus and cycle lane along Stoke Newington High Street. Most buses and bikes will no longer travel the longer route along Northwold, Rectory and Manse Road when heading towards the City. This will provide better access to High Street facilities
    Introduce two-way traffic operation along Rectory, Manse and Evering Roads
    New modal filters at the junctions of Tyssen, Hollar and Batley Roads at their junction with the High Street. These closures are designed to reduce rat-running through residential streets
    Create three new ‘pocket parks’ where these roads are closed to traffic, creating a more welcoming retail environment and encouraging people to spend more time in the town centre. There could be new seating areas, trees, local community gardens, entertainment, and cycling parking spaces
    Restrict vehicular access eastbound to Evering Road from Manse Road and to Northwold Road from Rectory Road
    Introduce a new type of pavement treatment at side road junctions called a ‘continuous footway’. Introducing continuous footways in Stoke Newington High Street intends to emphasise that pedestrians have priority
    Introduce three new pedestrian crossings, all with pedestrian countdown, making streets in the area easier and safer to cross
    Introduce a new 20mph speed limit and raised junctions and crossings to slow traffic speeds and reduce road danger
    Formalise parking and loading bays, including hours of operation
    High Street south of Brooke Road: Monday - Sunday from 07:00 - 19:00 , 20 minutes loading and one hour parking only
    High Street between Brooke Road and Stoke Newington Church Street: Monday - Sunday from 07:00 - 10:00, 20 minutes loading only

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  • Changes to A107 Clapton Common Road Safety Improvements

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Part of the Wetlands 2 Wetlands route.

    TfL says:
    We are proposing improvements to the pedestrian and cycling facilities with A107 Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue.

    A107 Clapton Common
    We would like to improve the way cyclists and pedestrians cross. We are proposing to relocate the pedestrian crossing south of Portland Avenue and install a new parallel pedestrian and cycle crossing at the junction Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue. This new crossing for pedestrians and cyclists would make crossing easier for all users.

    Craven Walk would become one-way only (northbound) between the A107 Clapton Common Road and Belz Terrace, except for cycles.

    We also propose to remove a section of the bus lane at bus stop (CU) south of Portland Avenue on the A107 and convert this into a wider pedestrian footway to create better visibility.

    Improved Vehicular Access

    We propose to improve vehicular access on Castlewood Road, Ravensdale Road and Lingwood Road. To achieve this we would need to remove a small section of parking on either side of the carriageway. We would implement single yellow line parking restrictions, to create better visibility and accommodate turning movements.

    We also propose to implement the parking restriction times from 8.30am to 6.30pm Monday to Saturday.

    Traffic impacts

    We predict no significant impact on general traffic times.

    Cars previously turning out of Craven Walk onto A107 Clapton Common may have a slightly longer journey, although by no more than a few minutes. Bus journeys would not be impacted.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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