Things tagged 'consultation'

limited to the area of Hackney Cycling Campaign:

33 issues found for 'consultation':

  • Camden - Tottenham Hale cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 4 threads

    At approximately 12km, this route would connect the town centres of Tottenham Hale, Seven Sisters and the Nag's Head, making it easier for people to make local journeys and use local services. The route would use both main roads and quieter back streets.

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  • Hackney - Isle of Dogs cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 2 threads

    This 7.5km route would stretch from Hackney to the Isle of Dogs via Westferry, Mile End and Victoria Park. It would connect with the cycle routes between Stratford and Aldgate and Barking to Tower Hill, as well as the proposed Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf crossing. There are currently two options in Hackney we want your views on.

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  • Lea Bridge - Dalston cycle route

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    This 3km route would fill the gap between Lea Bridge and the existing cycle route between the City and Tottenham at Dalston. From Lea Bridge the proposed route heads towards Lea Bridge Road to Lea Bridge roundabout, after which it joins quieter back streets including Downs Park Road and Sandringham Road to connect through to Dalston.

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  • Balls Pond Road Cycle Superhighway 1

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Hackney council says:

    Hackney Council is working with Islington
    Council and Transport for London (TfL) to make
    improvements to the Cycle Superhighway Route
    1 (CS1) on Balls Pond Road.

    In February 2015 TfL in partnership with
    Hackney Council consulted on the CS1 route
    which included two options for Balls Pond Road:
    an option for advisory cycle lanes on each
    side of the road and an option for a two-way
    segregated cycle track. A positive response to
    the consultation was received showing overall
    support for the segregated two-way cycle track
    along Balls Pond Road.

    In autumn 2015 a second consultation was
    held by TfL in partnership with Hackney Council
    on a motor traffic reduction scheme in the De
    Beauvoir area to assist users of the CS1 route.
    We are now seeking your views on measures
    required to implement the segregated two-way
    cycle track along Balls Pond Road between the
    junctions of Culford Road and Kingsbury Road.
    These measures would complete the route, safely
    connecting the two halves of the CS1.

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  • Englefield Road - De Beauvoir area - Environmental and cycle improvements to CS1

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Hackney says:
    "The Council is committed to making Hackney’s roads safer for everyone living, working
    and visiting the borough. These changes aim to create an environment that will encourage
    more walking and cycling, improve air quality and reduce emissions within the local area.
    Our Transport Strategy includes a Liveable Neighbourhoods Plan, which recognises that local
    streets are not just places to park vehicles or drive, walk and cycle on. They are places where
    we socialise and live our lives. An aspiration is to reclaim Hackney’s streets from motor
    traffic congestion and transform them into the most attractive and liveable neighbourhoods
    in London.
    One key objective for this proposal is to create a safer, more pleasant environment for
    cycling on the CS1 route through the De Beauvoir area.
    Back in autumn 2015 Transport for London (TfL) in partnership with Hackney Council
    consulted on a motor traffic reduction scheme in the De Beauvoir area that assists users
    of the CS1 route. These proposed modal filters have now been introduced.
    One of the proposals that was not taken forward at that time was a zebra crossing on
    Englefield Road near the junction of Culford Road. From continued feedback from residents,
    and users of the CS1 route through this area, the Council has now reviewed the design and
    location which provides a safe crossing point for cyclists, as well as pedestrians, crossing
    Englefield Road. Please see the drawing attached for more detail.
    Introducing this duel crossing point on Englefield Road at Culford Road will also allow the
    relocation of two of the existing modal filters to be moved to this new crossing point. Modal
    filters are closures to motorised traffic that still allow access for pedestrians and cyclists. "

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  • Stoke Newington Gyratory

    Created by Simon Still // 1 thread

    We have worked with Hackney Council on proposals for how Stoke Newington would look and operate after the gyratory is removed. Our plans would provide a new northbound cycle track on the A10 and a new bus and cycle lane enabling people to cycle southbound on Stoke Newington High Street.

    This would remove a significant barrier to cycling in the area and provide new traffic-free public spaces to meet, shop, play and relax and a host of other improvements aimed at creating a more attractive and less traffic-dominated environment for people.

    Our plans will accommodate the area’s future growth and encourage active travel, with more people choosing to walk, cycle and use public transport and less people travelling by car.

    These proposals aim to improve the quality of life in the area by:

    Transforming the town centre by creating a single unified retail location with an enhanced environment for pedestrians and cyclists
    Improving the public transport interchange, achieved through two-way bus operation, reducing congestion, and simplifying bus stops
    Improving cycling facilities and access through the A10
    Encouraging more journeys by walking, cycling or public transport to/from the High Street
    Reducing rat-running in residential streets

    Our proposals would:

    Introduce a new northbound cycle track with bus stop bypasses on Stoke Newington High Street providing a dedicated space for people to cycle
    Introduce a new southbound bus and cycle lane along Stoke Newington High Street. Most buses and bikes will no longer travel the longer route along Northwold, Rectory and Manse Road when heading towards the City. This will provide better access to High Street facilities
    Introduce two-way traffic operation along Rectory, Manse and Evering Roads
    New modal filters at the junctions of Tyssen, Hollar and Batley Roads at their junction with the High Street. These closures are designed to reduce rat-running through residential streets
    Create three new ‘pocket parks’ where these roads are closed to traffic, creating a more welcoming retail environment and encouraging people to spend more time in the town centre. There could be new seating areas, trees, local community gardens, entertainment, and cycling parking spaces
    Restrict vehicular access eastbound to Evering Road from Manse Road and to Northwold Road from Rectory Road
    Introduce a new type of pavement treatment at side road junctions called a ‘continuous footway’. Introducing continuous footways in Stoke Newington High Street intends to emphasise that pedestrians have priority
    Introduce three new pedestrian crossings, all with pedestrian countdown, making streets in the area easier and safer to cross
    Introduce a new 20mph speed limit and raised junctions and crossings to slow traffic speeds and reduce road danger
    Formalise parking and loading bays, including hours of operation
    High Street south of Brooke Road: Monday - Sunday from 07:00 - 19:00 , 20 minutes loading and one hour parking only
    High Street between Brooke Road and Stoke Newington Church Street: Monday - Sunday from 07:00 - 10:00, 20 minutes loading only

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  • Changes to A107 Clapton Common Road Safety Improvements

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Part of the Wetlands 2 Wetlands route.

    TfL says:
    We are proposing improvements to the pedestrian and cycling facilities with A107 Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue.

    A107 Clapton Common
    We would like to improve the way cyclists and pedestrians cross. We are proposing to relocate the pedestrian crossing south of Portland Avenue and install a new parallel pedestrian and cycle crossing at the junction Clapton Common junctions with Craven Walk and Portland Avenue. This new crossing for pedestrians and cyclists would make crossing easier for all users.

    Craven Walk would become one-way only (northbound) between the A107 Clapton Common Road and Belz Terrace, except for cycles.

    We also propose to remove a section of the bus lane at bus stop (CU) south of Portland Avenue on the A107 and convert this into a wider pedestrian footway to create better visibility.

    Improved Vehicular Access

    We propose to improve vehicular access on Castlewood Road, Ravensdale Road and Lingwood Road. To achieve this we would need to remove a small section of parking on either side of the carriageway. We would implement single yellow line parking restrictions, to create better visibility and accommodate turning movements.

    We also propose to implement the parking restriction times from 8.30am to 6.30pm Monday to Saturday.

    Traffic impacts

    We predict no significant impact on general traffic times.

    Cars previously turning out of Craven Walk onto A107 Clapton Common may have a slightly longer journey, although by no more than a few minutes. Bus journeys would not be impacted.

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  • Proposals for the Creation of a Major Road Network (London)

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    From the DfT:
    As part of the Transport Investment Strategy, the government committed to creating a Major Road Network (MRN).

    This consultation asks for views on:
    how to define the MRN
    the role that local, regional and national bodies will play in the MRN investment programme
    which schemes will be eligible for MRN funding

    A new MRN would help deliver the following objectives:
    reduce congestion
    support economic growth and rebalancing
    support housing delivery
    support all road users
    support the Strategic Road Network

    The creation of an MRN will allow for dedicated funding from the National Roads Fund to be used to improve this middle tier of our busiest and most economically important local authority ‘A’ roads.

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  • New London Plan 2017

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London.gov.uk says:

    What is the new London Plan?
    The London Plan is one of the most important documents for this city.
    It's a strategic plan which shapes how London evolves and develops. All planning decisions should follow London Plan policies, and it sets a policy framework for local plans across London.
    The current 2016 consolidation Plan is still the adopted Development Plan. However the Draft London Plan is a material consideration in planning decisions. It gains more weight as it moves through the process to adoption, however the weight given to it is a matter for the decision maker.

    Consultation on the draft London Plan
    Consultation on this plan is open. Comments will be publicly available. After the consultation, comments are reviewed by an inspector and you may be called in to discuss comments at the Examination in Public.

    What is an Examination in Public?
    At the end of the consultation period your comments will be reviewed by the independent Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State to carry out the Examination in Public for the London Plan.
    You may be invited to discuss your comments at the Examination in Public. All comments will be made available to the public at the end of the consultation period. The legal provisions for the London Plan are in Part VIII of the Greater London Authority (GLA) Act 1999 (as amended) in sections 334 to 341. The Examination in Public is covered in Section 338.

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  • Heavy Goods Vehicles Safety Standard Permit /Direct Vision Standard

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Tfl says:

    We have undertaken research that shows that in 2015, Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) were involved in disproportionately high numbers of fatal collisions with cyclists (78 per cent) and pedestrians (20 per cent) on London’s streets, despite only making up four per cent of the overall miles driven in the Capital. The Direct Vision Standard (DVS) forms part of The Mayor, Sadiq Khan and TfL’s Vision Zero approach to reducing road danger. The DVS categorises HGVs on the level of the driver’s direct vision from the cab.

    We consulted earlier this year on the principles of a new DVS. Listening to the feedback from this consultation and working closely with industry and stakeholders we have now further developed this scheme. The Consultation report and Responses to Issues Raised document from this first phase of consultation are available to view in from the links at the bottom of this text. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    We are now seeking your views on proposals to introduce a new Safety Standard Permit Scheme as part of DVS which widens our approach beyond direct vision and includes a safe system approach to allow us to address a broader range of road danger risks.

    The proposed scheme would require all HGVs over 12 tonnes to hold a Safety Permit to operate in Greater London from 2020. HGVs will be given a rating between ‘zero-star’ (lowest) and ‘five-star’ (highest). Only those vehicles rated ‘one star’ and above would be allowed to enter of operate in London from 2020. Zero rated vehicles would only be allowed if they can prove compliance through safe system measures. By 2024 only ‘three-star’ rated HGVs and above would automatically be given a Safety Permit. HGVs rated two star and below would need to demonstrate increased safety through progressive safe system measures.

    The safe system could include specific industry recognised measures such as sensors, visual warnings and comprehensive driver training. The Safety Standard Permit scheme would evolve over time, taking into account advances in technology.

    Detailed information about the scheme and the approach in which we have arrived at our current proposals are set out in the consultation document. A full Integrated Impact Assessment is also included.

    The consultation approach
    We are undertaking a phased consultation approach at key stages of the development of the consultation proposals to implement the Direct Vision Standard:

    Phase 1 (24 January to 18 April 2017) – we set out the case for HGV driver direct vision and consulted on the Mayor of London’s outline proposals to introduce a Direct Vision Standard for HGVs in London and the principles of the Standard itself. The responses showed that, in general, there is support for the principle of a Direct Vision Standard.

    Phase 2a – policy consultation (this consultation) – this current phase of consultation seeks views and feedback on the scheme proposals as outlined above and within the supporting consultation document which includes supporting technical reports including the full Integrated Impact Assessment. Feedback from this phase of consultation will be used to develop a second IIA and finalise the scheme proposals to be included in phase 2b of the consultation.

    Phase 2b - Final scheme proposals and statutory consultation (Spring/Summer 2018) – this final phase will consult on the final proposals for the HGV Safety Standard Permit Scheme, including statutory consultation on the appropriate regulatory measure to ban or restrict HGVs in London under the scheme, subject to UK Government and European Commission support and notification.

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  • London Assembly cycling infrastructure investigation

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    Over recent years, TfL policy has increasingly focused on the construction of physical cycling infrastructure on London’s roads. A change in direction towards more segregated infrastructure followed our report in 2012 recommending this approach.

    Our investigation will cover the full range of cycling infrastructure in London, with a particular focus on:

    Cycle Superhighways: a form of cycle lane, designed to make cycling safer by helping keep cyclists away from general traffic, and offer direct and continuous cycling on major routes.

    Quietways: a network of cycle routes that link key destinations, improving safety and convenience through small-scale interventions.

    Mini-Hollands: TfL schemes to invest neighbourhood-level improvements in walking and cycling, involving a range of interventions in each area.

    Cycle parking: provision of parking spaces on-street, at stations or in dedicated parking facilities.

    It is important that TfL is able to establish the effectiveness of the infrastructure it installs on London’s roads. We are concerned that to date there has been no comprehensive study of the new infrastructure’s impact on cycling safety, modal share and other road users.

    Questions to answer:

    1. What progress on new cycling infrastructure has been made under Sadiq Khan, and what are his long-term plans?
    2. Has TfL resolved the problems that delayed some cycling schemes under the previous Mayor?
    3. Has segregation delivered the anticipated benefits on the Cycle Superhighways? How many cyclists are using these routes?
    4. To what extent has segregation had negative consequences for other road users and, if necessary, how can this be mitigated?
    5. Have Quietways delivered their anticipated benefits? How many cyclists are using them?
    6. What are the differences in infrastructure between inner and outer London? How can TfL ensure infrastructure in different areas is sufficient and appropriate to the location?
    7. How will TfL’s new ‘Strategic Cycling Analysis’ help determine where and how to invest in infrastructure?
    8. How appropriate is the 400-metre target set in the draft Transport Strategy? Can we equate proximity with access?
    9. Is TfL’s approach to public engagement working effectively to improve scheme designs and meet stakeholder needs?
    10. Are Londoners sufficiently aware of the cycling infrastructure available to them, and how can awareness be increased?
    11. How is TfL using infrastructure to attract a more diverse range of people to cycle in London?
    12. Is there sufficient cycle parking in London, and is it in the right locations?
    13. How are the lessons of the Mini-Hollands and other previous cycling schemes being applied elsewhere?
    14. Should cycling infrastructure be oriented toward longer-distance commuting journeys, or more localised trips?

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  • London Assembly investigation: Walking & Cycling at Outer London Junctions

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly says:

    Our investigation
    What different approaches could TfL and London boroughs take to improve junctions and increase walking and cycling in Outer London?

    Small pockets of improvement don’t change the fact that most London streets are dominated by traffic and noise. They are hostile places even to step out into for a pint of milk.

    On behalf of the London Assembly Transport Committee, Caroline Russell AM is investigating how our streets and junctions can become more people-friendly.

    Get involved
    There are a number of specific questions the Committee is seeking to answer. Please address any questions where you have relevant views and information to share, and feel free to cover any other issues you would like the Committee to consider.

    Are there lessons to be learned from previous junction improvements?

    How can we enable more people to walk and cycle?

    How can we make our streets and junctions less hostile to people getting around by bike and on foot?

    How do you get all road users on board?

    Please email transportcommittee@london.gov.uk by August 11 and share the investigation on Twitter using #OuterLondonJunctions

    Key Facts
    The Mayor and TfL are promoting walking and cycling as a form of active travel and a way to reduce health inequalities - however, currently, over 40 percent of Londoners fall short of the recommended 150 minutes of activity per week.

    TfL research has found that people who live in Outer London tend to walk less than those who live in Inner London. Public transport coverage is lower and car ownership is higher in Outer London, with cars making up a larger share of journeys. In particular, people who live in Outer London are less likely to walk children to school, walk to see friends or relatives, and walk to pubs, restaurants and cinemas.

    In 2015:
    53 percent of Inner Londoners walked at least five journeys a week, compared to 35 percent of Outer Londoners
    47 percent of Inner Londoners walked as part of longer journeys on other forms of transport at least five times a week, compared to 41 percent of Outer Londoners

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  • London Assembly Transport Committee Bus network design, safety

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    London Assembly said:
    "Buses are the busiest form of public transport in London. The city has 675 bus routes, with around 9,000 buses in operation and over 19,000 bus stops. Approximately 2.5 billion bus passenger trips are made every year, around double the number made on London Underground.
    "TfL commissions private operators to run bus services in London, awarding seven-year contracts to operate bus routes. Although bus safety (in terms of casualty numbers) has improved over recent years, there was a spike in bus collision fatalities in 2015.
    "The London Assembly Transport Committee is investigating two aspects of bus services in London: Network Design and Safety."

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  • Mayor's Transport Strategy

    Created by Simon Munk // 1 thread

    Draft Mayor's Transport Strategy 2017
    On June 21 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, published a draft of the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The document sets out the Mayor’s policies and proposals to reshape transport in London over the next 25 years.

    About the strategy

    Transport has the potential to shape London, from the streets Londoners live, work and spend time on, to the Tube, rail and bus services they use every day.

    By using the Healthy Streets Approach to prioritise human health and experience in planning the city, the Mayor wants to change London’s transport mix so the city works better for everyone.

    Three key themes are at the heart of the strategy.

    1. Healthy Streets and healthy people
    Creating streets and street networks that encourage walking, cycling and public transport use will reduce car dependency and the health problems it creates.

    2. A good public transport experience
    Public transport is the most efficient way for people to travel over distances that are too long to walk or cycle, and a shift from private car to public transport could dramatically reduce the number of vehicles on London’s streets.

    3. New homes and jobs
    More people than ever want to live and work in London. Planning the city around walking, cycling and public transport use will unlock growth in new areas and ensure that London grows in a way that benefits everyone.

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  • Tower Hamlets Local Infrastructure Fund consultation

    Created by Alex Jenkins // 1 thread

    The council is consulting on the Local Infrastructure Fund (LIF) to give local people a say in defining the infrastructure priorities for their areas.

    The consultation period will run for six weeks from 27 June 2017 to 8 August 2017.

    Tower Hamlets has grown rapidly in recent years, and a number of new housing and employment developments have been built across the borough. Additional growth is expected in the future and the council recognises that this can put pressure on local services and infrastructure - that is, on areas like transport, schools, healthcare facilities and parks/open spaces.

    To deal with the impacts, developers are required to pay a financial contribution called the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL). The borough has apportioned to each LIF Area, 25 per cent of the money from which the income was generated. Please refer to the LIF Area Profile documents for the specific amounts collected so far for each LIF Area. The council must then use this money to support the development of the local area, by addressing the demands that development places on the area, and by making sure the right infrastructure and services are in place for residents.

    In addition to understanding local people’s infrastructure priorities, the council is engaging with local people and giving them an opportunity to nominate projects that they would like to see delivered in their neighborhood. These can be new or existing projects already identified by the council in the LIF Area Profiles. Prior to the allocation of funding to any project and in line with the regulations, you will need to clearly demonstrate how the project will deliver the provision, improvement, replacement, operation and/or maintenance of infrastructure or anything else that is concerned with addressing the demands that development places on an area.

    This consultation provides local people with an opportunity to nominate up to three (new or existing) projects. Prior to the allocation of the funding to any project and in line with the regulations it will need to be clearly demonstrated how the project will deliver the provision, improvement, replacement, operation or maintenance of infrastructure or provides anything else that is concerned with addressing the demands that development places on an area.

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  • TfL Proposals for Shoreditch High Street between Hackney Road and New Inn Yard

    Natalie G // 1 thread

    Junction of Shoreditch High Street with Rivington Street and Calvert Avenue:

    The following measures would make it safer and more comfortable for cyclists to travel east-west through this staggered junction across Shoreditch High Street:

    We would introduce a right-turn ban for all traffic except cycles exiting Rivington Street into Shoreditch High Street. This would improve safety for cyclists waiting to turn into Rivington Street and pedestrians using the nearby pedestrian crossing. Our latest traffic counts show a maximum of 33 vehicles per hour making this right turn, and we are satisfied alternative routes exist
    We would remove a southbound general traffic lane on Shoreditch High Street to accommodate two new right-turn pockets and three new traffic islands. The traffic islands would protect road users waiting to turn right into either Rivington Street (cycles only) or Calvert Avenue (all traffic)
    We would reduce the size of the footway by a small amount on the northern corner of Shoreditch High Street and Calvert Avenue to accommodate the turning movements of larger vehicles once the new traffic islands are in place
    Junction of Shoreditch High Street and Hackney Road:

    We would enlarge the traffic island to the west of the southbound slip road, reducing the carriageway width and the number of southbound lanes from two to one. This would create more footway space for pedestrians and reduce the distance people have to cross. Making this section of road a single lane for motor traffic would also create space for an advisory southbound cycle lane and reduce the likelihood of conflict between cyclists and motor traffic
    Shoreditch High Street:

    We would install a new southbound bus lane (operational Monday to Saturday, 7am to 7pm) in place of a general traffic lane from south of Rivington Street to the pedestrian crossing opposite New Inn Yard. This bus lane would also be available to cycles, taxis, motorcycles and coaches. The loading bay outside the Ace Hotel, and the existing bus stand and bus stops on Shoreditch High Street would not be affected by the bus lane

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  • Rivington Street and Charlotte Road Pedestrian, Cycle and Air Quality Improvemen

    Natalie G // 1 thread

    Rivington Street between Great Eastern Street and Garden Walk It is proposed to relocate the existing parking bays to improve the westbound cycle contraflow along this one-way road, making it safer for cyclists travelling in the opposite direction towards oncoming traffic.

    The current cycle contraflow arrangement forces cyclists to ride very close to parked vehicles increasing the risk of collisions when someone opens the door on the path of a cyclist.

    The current arrangement also encourages travelling westbound cyclists to ride in the middle of the road risking a head on collision with a vehicle travelling eastbound.


    The Proposals include:

    Relocating the existing permit holders and motorcycle parking bays located on the southern side of Rivington Street, to the other side of the road. The overall number of permit holders and motorcycle parking spaces in this section of Rivington Street will

    not change.

    Relocating the parking bays to the northern side of Rivington Street will make this section safer for cyclists, making it more attractive and encouraging more people to cycle along this route and the wider Q13.

    2 Rivington Street – Charlotte Road junction

    This junction is a place where local workers, residents and visitors pass through, but at the moment it is a confusing place with insufficient identity that doesn’t cater to its Hackney wants to improve the public realm at the Rivington Street – Charlotte Road junction, bringing benefits for the local community and making walking and cycling at this location easier and more accessible.


    The Proposals include:

    Raising the junction and the approaches and using different materials to encourage drivers to slow down, making it safer for people walking and cycling at the junction.

    Introducing a shared space area at the junction with a kerb-free flat surface with no barriers, allowing pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles to occupy the same space, with more freedom of movement.

    Enhancing the public realm to improve the overall value of the junction, including high quality materials to improve aesthetics and recognise the architectural quality of adjoining buildings.

    Removing kerbs to allow easier movement around for wheelchair users, the elderly and those with pushchairs.

    Relocating the motorcycle parking bay on Charlotte Road (north) to the other side of the road to create deflection and reduce vehicle speeds on the southbound approach to the junction.

    Relocating the cycle parking on Charlotte Road (north) to Charlotte Road (south) toimprove access and minimising the use of traffic signs and road markings to reduce clutter.

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  • Chatsworth Road/Millfields Road/Powerscroft Road New Signalised Junction

    Natalie G // 1 thread

    Part of the Quietway 2 scheme to facilitate crossing of Chatsworth Road.
    Deadline is 25 November 2016 - so please let us have comments by 18 November 2016 at the latest.

    The proposals include:

    1 Replacing the existing zebra crossing with traffic signals at the Chatsworth Road\ Millfields Road\ Powerscroft Road junction. This will be designed to make the junction easier and safer for pedestrians and cyclists as there have been a total of seven accidents in recent years. Six of these involved cyclists. There will be a Green Man crossing on each approach to the junction and one that will replace the zebra crossing.

    2 Introducing a raised table across the junction of Chatsworth Road and Millfields Road to reduce traffic speeds.

    3 Creating a new link and crossing for cyclists between Powerscroft Road and Millfields Park. This will be a new shared space with the route for cyclists clearly marked for the benefit of all users. New cycle stands will also be installed.

    4 Introducing new footway into the western arm of Millfields Road as part of the shared space. The existing barrier will be replaced with a lockable bollard and new trees.

    5 Extending double yellow lines on the south side of Millfields Road, up to the junction with Sewdley Street to facilitate safe bus and traffic movement.

    6 Removing two parking bays on Powerscroft Road at the junction with Chatsworth Road to improve cycle access and the bus alignment approaching the junction.

    7 Relocating the Disabled bay outside No. 176 Chatsworth Road and removing one parking space to increase visibility at the new crossing point.

    8 Extending the footway to reduce the pedestrian crossing distance and reduce traffic speed.

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  • Chatsworth Road/Millfields Road/Powerscroft Road New Signalised Junction

    Natalie G // 0 threads

    The proposals include:

    1 Replacing the existing zebra crossing with traffic signals at the Chatsworth Road\ Millfields Road\ Powerscroft Road junction. This will be designed to make the junction easier and safer for pedestrians and cyclists as there have been a total of seven accidents in recent years. Six of these involved cyclists. There will be a Green Man crossing on each approach to the junction and one that will replace the zebra crossing.

    2 Introducing a raised table across the junction of Chatsworth Road and Millfields Road to reduce traffic speeds.

    3 Creating a new link and crossing for cyclists between Powerscroft Road and Millfields Park. This will be a new shared space with the route for cyclists clearly marked for the benefit of all users. New cycle stands will also be installed.

    4 Introducing new footway into the western arm of Millfields Road as part of the shared space. The existing barrier will be replaced with a lockable bollard and new trees.

    5 Extending double yellow lines on the south side of Millfields Road, up to the junction with Sewdley Street to facilitate safe bus and traffic movement.

    6 Removing two parking bays on Powerscroft Road at the junction with Chatsworth Road to improve cycle access and the bus alignment approaching the junction.

    7 Relocating the Disabled bay outside No. 176 Chatsworth Road and removing one parking space to increase visibility at the new crossing point.

    8 Extending the footway to reduce the pedestrian crossing distance and reduce traffic speed.

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  • Chatsworth Road/Millfields Road/Powerscroft Road New Signalised Junction

    Natalie G // 0 threads

    The proposals include:

    1 Replacing the existing zebra crossing with traffic signals at the Chatsworth Road\ Millfields Road\ Powerscroft Road junction. This will be designed to make the junction easier and safer for pedestrians and cyclists as there have been a total of seven accidents in recent years. Six of these involved cyclists. There will be a Green Man crossing on each approach to the junction and one that will replace the zebra crossing.

    2 Introducing a raised table across the junction of Chatsworth Road and Millfields Road to reduce traffic speeds.

    3 Creating a new link and crossing for cyclists between Powerscroft Road and Millfields Park. This will be a new shared space with the route for cyclists clearly marked for the benefit of all users. New cycle stands will also be installed.

    4 Introducing new footway into the western arm of Millfields Road as part of the shared space. The existing barrier will be replaced with a lockable bollard and new trees.

    5 Extending double yellow lines on the south side of Millfields Road, up to the junction with Sewdley Street to facilitate safe bus and traffic movement.

    6 Removing two parking bays on Powerscroft Road at the junction with Chatsworth Road to improve cycle access and the bus alignment approaching the junction.

    7 Relocating the Disabled bay outside No. 176 Chatsworth Road and removing one parking space to increase visibility at the new crossing point.

    8 Extending the footway to reduce the pedestrian crossing distance and reduce traffic speed.

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  • Whiston Road

    Natalie G // 1 thread

    The proposals for this route along Whiston Road include:

    Removing some of the existing speed cushions and replacing them with raised carriageway
    tables. These speed tables will be raised to footway level to provide a traffic calming feature
    to assist in reducing the speed of traffic along Whiston Road, making it a safer environment for
    pedestrians, cyclists and drivers.

    Please let us have your comments before 17 October 2016 so that we can draft a group response.

    thanks
    Natalie

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  • QW2: Morning Lane cycle crossing

    Created by Harry Fletcher-Wood // 1 thread

    As part of the Quietway 2 route, Hackney Council propose a cycle crossing, raised table and motor vehicle restrictions at the crossing of Morning Lane.

    Looks good at first sight, if you have any thoughts about the scheme please could you add them by Friday, 5th August, so that Harry and Natalie can draft a group response.

    Please sign in to vote.

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